Helpful Grammar Tips

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Iwannajumpout
Idiot
Iwannajumpout
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Mibba Blog
August 10th, 2006 at 08:53pm
While we're on this, here's another thing.
"I guess you won't do that again," she laughed.
"No, I don't think so," he sighed.
You can't laugh a sentence. You can't sigh and speak at the same time. That kind of non-speech related tag makes no sense. You can do those actions before or after or in between words, but not during them.
HavingAGreenDay
Falling In Love With The Board
HavingAGreenDay
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Mibba
August 10th, 2006 at 09:21pm
Iwannajumpout:
While we're on this, here's another thing.
"I guess you won't do that again," she laughed.
"No, I don't think so," he sighed.
You can't laugh a sentence. You can't sigh and speak at the same time. That kind of non-speech related tag makes no sense. You can do those actions before or after or in between words, but not during them.
I think it's quite possible to laugh out your words. It sounds something like Elmer Fudd. Laughing

I'm not sure if this is grammatically inaccurate or not though. It might make more sense to do it this way:

"I guess you won't do that again," she said, laughing.

This is nothing serious though; let us not get too picky. Fizz
davey jones.
Falling In Love With The Board
davey jones.
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Mibba Blog
August 10th, 2006 at 09:43pm
I see this alot also:

I saw him standing there.... .

Like ending a trail off with a period. That nags me so much.
you're pathetic...
Shoot Me, I'm A Newbie
you're pathetic...
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August 13th, 2006 at 09:23am
I'm afraid this is going to sound really horrible about all 'those illiterate fools' but, why don't you just ignore their stories if there are too many grammatical mistakes?
I think that you editors do a really brilliant job. I really admire you guys; and I dread how many ineligible stories you guys correct.
As a story writer I keep a dictionary at my side when I write my story and only really use words that I'm sure how to spell. Also, as a writer and reader I find it irritating to read a story with bad grammer and spelling. So far I've found one; so unless this site has a collection of very literate members you guys do an amazing job.
*Applauds the editors.*
you're pathetic...
Shoot Me, I'm A Newbie
you're pathetic...
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August 13th, 2006 at 09:40am
I've just got to add that I found this thread helpful and useful, and I think that all other authors should read it. Therefor I put the link to this thread in a journal. I hope you don't mind...I can always delete the journal if you do mind.
ThisIsGreenDay
Falling In Love With The Board
ThisIsGreenDay
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Mibba
August 23rd, 2006 at 10:05pm
in_paradise_with_st_jimmy:
Ellipses/Dot-Dot-Dot

"Dot-dot-dot" shows a pause or a cliff hanger at the end of a paragraph.

Correct use: Oh yeah...but what if I don't want to?
Incorrect use: Oh yeah... But what if I don't want to?
-No spaces after them. They shouldn't end a sentence unless it's supposed to be a cliff hanger. The next part of the sentence should not begin with a capital letter.


This use is used in many, many, many books. It is correct.
ThisIsGreenDay
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Mibba
August 23rd, 2006 at 10:12pm
What's in a name?:
Iwannajumpout:
Here's a thing with the dot dot dot (otherwise known as ellipsis)

"Oh yeah.... But what if I don't want to?" Note that there are four periods in my example. That means an ellipsis at the end of a sentence. In that case, the capital "B" in "but" is permitted.


Originally ellipses were used only in quotes to show that part of the quote had been left out. It's not meant to be used as "cliff-hangers" Wink
If you want to make cliff-hangers you're supposed to write: "Oh yeah-"

I'm not an editor so I don't care about the actual use of an ellipsis, but I just figured you wanted to know Retard
*pats on the back*

Ex-fucking-actly! That's how you do it!

I didn't get straight A's/100's in English class, each quarter for four years of high school for nothing!
Lee
Idiot
Lee
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Mibba
August 28th, 2006 at 02:39pm
Hey, thank you for clearing up the "you're", "your" bit, I have always been slightly confused between them.Smile
Iwannajumpout
Idiot
Iwannajumpout
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Mibba Blog
September 1st, 2006 at 06:44pm
I've been pondering this. Which is the proper way to do this? Is it this way?
He dropped to his knees as shame swamped him. "I can't believe this," he wailed.

Or is it

He dropped to his knees as shame swamped him.

"I can't believe this," he wailed.
?

The first way seems too cluttered, but at the same time, the second way seems too spaced out. Laughing Hence, my dilemma. As well, would it be different if there was no tag?
Banach95
King For A Couple Of Days
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Mibba Blog
September 1st, 2006 at 06:47pm
I believe it SHOULD be the first way...

THEN a new paragraph after the dialog line.

He dropped to his knees as shame swamped him. "I can't believe this," he wailed.

She ran over to where he was on the ground crying. blah blah blah
Pickle
Geek
Pickle
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Mibba
September 2nd, 2006 at 04:00pm
Iwannajumpout:
I've been pondering this. Which is the proper way to do this? Is it this way?
He dropped to his knees as shame swamped him. "I can't believe this," he wailed.

Or is it

He dropped to his knees as shame swamped him.

"I can't believe this," he wailed.
?

The first way seems too cluttered, but at the same time, the second way seems too spaced out. Laughing Hence, my dilemma. As well, would it be different if there was no tag?


The first way is probably the cleanest route to go. You don't want to space out every line you write because it will be so long, so spacy, and just not cool. It's okay to have a bigger pargraph and a variety in size. Start a new paragraph after you have made a point, want to emphasize soemthing, and after dialouge. Use a new paragraph for every new person who speaks. That's what I do at least.


And, this has nothing to do with your dilemma, there is a difference to its and it's. It's is the apostrophe version of it is and if you can repeat your sentence and have it is in place of it's, then you have used it correctly. If it is does not make sense, use its. It's (it is) a simple way to remember one of the most commonly misused tactics.
Banach95
King For A Couple Of Days
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Mibba Blog
September 7th, 2006 at 03:53pm
Okay...

I have another one...

mom/mother, dad/father and Mom/Mother, Dad/Father.

When you are using the 'dad' in place of a proper name then it needs to have a captial letter; "Dad, I love you," she said.

Only if you're using the word dad to describe a person then it is without the capital; "That's my dad over there," she said.
davey jones.
Falling In Love With The Board
davey jones.
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Mibba Blog
September 7th, 2006 at 10:17pm
Here's one that bugs the shit out of me.

DO NOT USE A PERIOD WHEN USING "she said" or "he said." Evil or Very Mad

WRONG WAY:

"Hello there." She said.

RIGHT WAY:

"Hello there," she said.

If more people actually READ this thread, there wouldn't be as much half-minded stories that looks like a primate typed it up.

Morons. Rolling Eyes
in_paradise_with_st_jimmy
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in_paradise_with_st_jimmy
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Mibba Blog
September 30th, 2006 at 04:39pm
you're pathetic...:
I've just got to add that I found this thread helpful and useful, and I think that all other authors should read it. Therefor I put the link to this thread in a journal. I hope you don't mind...I can always delete the journal if you do mind.

No, I don't mind you putting a link to this in your journal; I want to thank you for it, actually. Help spread the word. So, good on ya for taking the initiative to do that. Up
sailor spaikae!
Jackass
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Mibba Blog
October 1st, 2006 at 07:51am
Has anyone else noticed people rarely ever use semi-colons and if they do it's usually incorrectly.

I think we'll cover them now.

Semi-colon

A semi-colon is a punctuation mark, it looks like this: ;.

There are two points you must remember about the semi-colon.

Point 1: A semi-colon separates two groups of words which are closely linked in meaning, e.g.

She threw away his socks; they were full of holes.

The second part of the sentence either tells us more about the first half, or tells us the result or cause of the first half.

In this example the person throwing away the socks is the result of the second half (the second half is the cause).

Point 2: The two groups of words must be able to stand as sentences on their own, if we wanted to we could write.

She threw away his socks. They were full of holes.

This is incorrect usage

She gave him his tea; as soon as he came home.

This is because the words after the semi-colon do not make sense as a sentence so we write

She gave him his tea as soon as he came home.

but

She gave him his tea; he always had it as soon as he came home.

Is correct because both parts of the sentence make sense alone.

So, why use a semi-colon instead of a comma, full-stop (period) or connective, they are still correct.

Because it's more grammatically accurate and makes you look sharper - which is a good thing.

I think I'll do colons whilst I'm at it.

Colon

The colon looks like this : and has a special and definite use.

A colon often means that something is to follow, often a list, however it can also be a dramatic statement.

These examples show correct use of the colon:

He trembled as he looked at what lay on his desk, ready for the exam: a ball-point pen, a pencil, a rubber, a ruler and two blank sheets of paper.

or

These were her last words: "So little done, so much to do."

This is incorrect usage of a colon:

There are two people I will not have in my house your friends,: Eddie and Sam.

You could either:

a) Place the colon after house and leave the comma where it is.

OR

b)Place the comma after house and leave the colon where it is.

a)There are two people I will not have in my house: your friends, Eddie and Sam.

b)There are two people I will not have in my house, your friends: Eddie and Sam.

Either is correct, however punctuation placement can alter the meaning of a sentence so be careful.
in_paradise_with_st_jimmy
Falling In Love With The Board
in_paradise_with_st_jimmy
Age: 29
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Posts: 7017

Mibba Blog
October 2nd, 2006 at 08:42pm
Over The Rainbow:
Has anyone else noticed people rarely ever use semi-colons and if they do it's usually incorrectly.

I think we'll cover them now.

Semi-colon

A semi-colon is a punctuation mark, it looks like this: ;.

There are two points you must remember about the semi-colon.

Point 1: A semi-colon separates two groups of words which are closely linked in meaning, e.g.

She threw away his socks; they were full of holes.

The second part of the sentence either tells us more about the first half, or tells us the result or cause of the first half.

In this example the person throwing away the socks is the result of the second half (the second half is the cause).

Point 2: The two groups of words must be able to stand as sentences on their own, if we wanted to we could write.

She threw away his socks. They were full of holes.

This is incorrect usage

She gave him his tea; as soon as he came home.

This is because the words after the semi-colon do not make sense as a sentence so we write

She gave him his tea as soon as he came home.

but

She gave him his tea; he always had it as soon as he came home.

Is correct because both parts of the sentence make sense alone.

So, why use a semi-colon instead of a comma, full-stop (period) or connective, they are still correct.

Because it's more grammatically accurate and makes you look sharper - which is a good thing.

I think I'll do colons whilst I'm at it.

Colon

The colon looks like this : and has a special and definite use.

A colon often means that something is to follow, often a list, however it can also be a dramatic statement.

These examples show correct use of the colon:

He trembled as he looked at what lay on his desk, ready for the exam: a ball-point pen, a pencil, a rubber, a ruler and two blank sheets of paper.

or

These were her last words: "So little done, so much to do."

This is incorrect usage of a colon:

There are two people I will not have in my house your friends,: Eddie and Sam.

You could either:

a) Place the colon after house and leave the comma where it is.

OR

b)Place the comma after house and leave the colon where it is.

a)There are two people I will not have in my house: your friends, Eddie and Sam.

b)There are two people I will not have in my house, your friends: Eddie and Sam.

Either is correct, however punctuation placement can alter the meaning of a sentence so be careful.

Oh, this is good, mind if I add this to the original post? Cool
sailor spaikae!
Jackass
sailor spaikae!
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Mibba Blog
October 3rd, 2006 at 03:33pm
No, I don't - help yourself, glad to be of assistance Smile
Music to my ears
Idiot
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October 11th, 2006 at 08:56am
I totally agree.
Anji
Basket Case
Anji
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Blog
October 15th, 2006 at 12:21pm
GreenDay_Fan17:
i feel like i'm in english class Laughing
This is actually quite embaressing for people who are native English speakers.
CristhyneS
Jackass
CristhyneS
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Mibba
October 16th, 2006 at 07:28pm
Anji:
GreenDay_Fan17:
i feel like i'm in english class Laughing
This is actually quite embaressing for people who are native English speakers.


At least it should be.
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