Is rewarding kids for good grades bribery or motivation?

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newagecarny
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Mibba
December 6th, 2007 at 12:33pm
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It takes different things to motivate different people. Money just seems to work the best.
Am I the only one who thinks thats sad? Coolio

It is sad, but then again money makes the world go round
miau
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December 6th, 2007 at 05:03pm
It is possible that I'm getting this wrong, but I think that this is about general rewards, not only money.

I personally was only allowed to visit my friends when I was finished with my homework and it was correct and looked clean. So I took care because I wanted to see my friends.
Or another exmaple, that just happened this year, I waso nly allowed to see Adam Green in concert if I got a at least average mark in maths. Of course I also would have studied if the good mark wasn't a condition to be able to the concert, but the good mark being my only chance to go was a kind of extra inducement.

Although I think...what was it? 50$? is a bit much, especially for younger kids.
My mother gave me 2 € for every "very good" and 1€ for every "good" last year, so I recieved 9 € altogether.
newagecarny
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Mibba
December 6th, 2007 at 06:23pm
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It is possible that I'm getting this wrong, but I think that this is about general rewards, not only money.

I personally was only allowed to visit my friends when I was finished with my homework and it was correct and looked clean. So I took care because I wanted to see my friends.
Or another exmaple, that just happened this year, I waso nly allowed to see Adam Green in concert if I got a at least average mark in maths. Of course I also would have studied if the good mark wasn't a condition to be able to the concert, but the good mark being my only chance to go was a kind of extra inducement.

Although I think...what was it? 50$? is a bit much, especially for younger kids.
My mother gave me 2 € for every "very good" and 1€ for every "good" last year, so I recieved 9 € altogether.


Yes, but money is the most common reward.

however, most kids do get the "you can't do x until you finish your homework" treatment. Mainly because it actually works.
Micro Sheep
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December 6th, 2007 at 06:25pm
I agree with rewarding children for good grades, but not with money.I mean..allowing him to go somewhere special, get him a present ocasionally, but rewarding him with money for every good mark he gets, I think it's a bit over the limit..He could get used to it and then later in life expect to get something for every good thing he does,which doesn't happen.It looks like a pavlovian experiment to me.so yeah, I wouldn't reward my kid like that Cheese
rollerpig
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December 6th, 2007 at 08:51pm
Cartoon Caterpillar!:

Or another exmaple, that just happened this year, I waso nly allowed to see Adam Green in concert if I got a at least average mark in maths.
i got that for someone else, but it didn't work, i still had a d. Coolio
Mycophobia
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December 8th, 2007 at 12:00am
Hard work should be rewarded, good grades shouldn't. They are two different things.

If a family has lets say... three kids and they give them money for getting As and Bs, and they take away money for getting Ds and Fs. Now lets say the first kid, Bobby sits next to the really smart kid and has good vision, Bobby just copys off the smart kid during the test and BAM, he gets an A, Bobby is also in a group with alot of hardworking kids and his group earns an A due to the hardworking kids BAM anouther A. Bobbys older sister Suey on the other hand, has a really good memorey, she remembers how to do everything and never has to go over anything or read it more then once, she gets As too. And theres the other kid, Joey, hes 11 Joey has a learning disorder, he works hard and often stays up past 1 am studying and trying to figure everything out, he is unable to take good notes but always trys and always works very hard. Sadly he still has learning issues, everyone tells him he is lazy and stupid, even though he spends all his time trying to understand school, he works his ass off but gets a D due to the fact that he read the instructions wrong. His parents take his money away.

So now Bobby is encouraged to cheat more, Suey simpley lucked out, and Joey works hard for nothing, he eventully starts to think he is really stupid and he stops trying hard.
anti-christ of suburbia
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Mibba
December 9th, 2007 at 09:08pm
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Hard work should be rewarded, good grades shouldn't. They are two different things.

If a family has lets say... three kids and they give them money for getting As and Bs, and they take away money for getting Ds and Fs. Now lets say the first kid, Bobby sits next to the really smart kid and has good vision, Bobby just copys off the smart kid during the test and BAM, he gets an A, Bobby is also in a group with alot of hardworking kids and his group earns an A due to the hardworking kids BAM anouther A. Bobbys older sister Suey on the other hand, has a really good memorey, she remembers how to do everything and never has to go over anything or read it more then once, she gets As too. And theres the other kid, Joey, hes 11 Joey has a learning disorder, he works hard and often stays up past 1 am studying and trying to figure everything out, he is unable to take good notes but always trys and always works very hard. Sadly he still has learning issues, everyone tells him he is lazy and stupid, even though he spends all his time trying to understand school, he works his ass off but gets a D due to the fact that he read the instructions wrong. His parents take his money away.

So now Bobby is encouraged to cheat more, Suey simpley lucked out, and Joey works hard for nothing, he eventully starts to think he is really stupid and he stops trying hard.


that's a good example. Personally i think the reward should be for effort, if anything.
Anji
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December 10th, 2007 at 12:43pm
Is bribery and motavation not at times the same thing?
Sherlock
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December 10th, 2007 at 01:50pm
I would say that motivation is something that stays with you and becomes a part of your mindset, whereas bribary is a temporary thing. Dno
Hitchcock Starlet
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December 10th, 2007 at 09:00pm
Hm.
Well rewarding kids isn't so bad I guess. Gives the kiddos motivation.
On the other hand.
Kids get used to get money every time they actually do something. So,technically,it's all about money.
Macfadyen
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December 11th, 2007 at 01:29am
Can't earning money for hard work in school be compared to earning good money for hard work at a job?
I've always been taught to get a good education, so I can get a good job and make plenty of money to live my life freely. Coolio
Mass-suicide
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December 13th, 2007 at 01:34am
I tihkn you should reward urself like hen ur quitting smokin, bribery doesn't help and could make a limit to 5 bucks like common i do average and when i do good , my mom doesn;t pay attention!
neen bean
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December 13th, 2007 at 06:12am
I have a friend who gets about $100 for every A and he is a very bright person. He continues to do good and participate a lot in class. He says he's not really motivated by the money.
My other friend works hard and also gets very good grades but her parents give her barely anything (lunch money for a week, maybe) and she continues to do well without the money 'motivation'
My parents just tell me they're proud of me and that's all the motivation for me.
If kids need money to motivate themselves to work (not cheat) than it's not a bad idea. But the point is money isn't the only motivation.
norwegian wood.
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December 13th, 2007 at 06:03pm
Thing is, it really depends on the child, like zeenut the peanut said. Some kids will work hard whether they get the money or not, and some will only study purely for the reward. I guess it's motivation more than bribery, and I guess it's not such a bad thing to give your children money if they do well if it prevents them from buggering up later on in life when they can't get jobs.
trisha_goes_rawr
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December 13th, 2007 at 11:04pm
motivation. that way they know if they do as good as they can, they are going to get something cool in return, they have something to look foward too. yet they have to realize that won't be around forever, when they get older they can't expect to get money or prizes for every good thing they do. but i was brought up with getting money for good grades, and everything is fine with me :]
superfan
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March 11th, 2008 at 07:09am
Firstly - DOWN WITH EXAMS

Hmm... I suppose it is bribery but because kids are younger, it's motivation. It gives them a good reason to work hard. I'm not getting money or sweeties or a new toy for doing good in exams now, but I know I'll do it with my own kids one day.

There are really hard exams for young kids in extreme conditions and I think parents are supporting their kids by making it more fun. I think testing in year two is just stupid...I mean who cares if a 7 year old kid is a genius or not? There should be groups etc like reading and writing groups, based on who has the best ability, but not to make it obvious to the kids what's going on. I remember when my brother was in year two and one of the kids came out of school with really good grades, boasting about it, and I just though "why does it matter to you?" AND to the parents. I'm guessing he was promised a fighter jet or something...

There's more to life than exam results!
Matt Smith
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March 11th, 2008 at 02:32pm
I think the grades themsleves are a good enough motivation tbh.

And I don't think that money as a motivator really works, either. For example, half of my friends who are on EMA at college don't even turn up to the lessons anyway, when they could be earning £30 for the privelidge. If you actually can't be bothered then no amount of money is going to motivate you. On the other hand, people who just can't be arsed turn up to lessons and do no work at all, wasting their time and the teacher's, just so they can get EMA.

It's true that my parents reward me when I do well. But I don't even consider that when I'm doing my exams. I try hard because I want to improve, so that I can go to uni and get a good job, and therefore won't need to sponge money off my parents in the first place. The rewards (if I get any) are just secondary to the fact that I want to achieve things.

Besides, it seems rather harsh on parents who perhaps can't afford to spend £50, £100, £1000 on their kids for getting A grades. I know my parents can't. So the whole idea of grades=rewards seems to be purely the opportunity for the privelidge middle classes. It's said that in Britain, a bright child from a poor background will be overtaken by a less-clever child from a rich background by the mere age of seven. And I, for one, think the correlation between money and good education is really quite wrong because it prejudices against children from poorer backgrounds.
Kurtni
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March 11th, 2008 at 02:44pm
But you have to think, not everyone cares about what they get on their exams, or if they have high grades. Not everyone feels motivation from things like that, but it is still very important for their future. if I had children who weren't motivated in school because they weren't mature enough to see its importance, I'd do whatever I could to motivate them until that point came.

Rewards don''t have to be monitary all the time anyways, no one ever said that. But I know that when I was younger, getting 10$ for my grades or something was a big deal, and it did motivate me to do better. It isn't like you have to give your kid $500 for their grades or something, on one said anything extreme like that. But it's nice to have something to make you feel like you're working towards something.

And it's sad to think that other people cannot afford to do things like this, but what can you do about that? Poorer people might not be able to afford the internet, should we quit using that?You do everything you can to help less privillaged people, but that isn't a reason to not do everything you could to succeed.
Barney Stinson
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March 11th, 2008 at 03:05pm
Motivation. There's no point to bribing a kid for good grades. Motivate them for giving or creating a better life for themselves when there older and not living at home. But, don't forget to praise them for a job well done and treat them once in a while, not everytime they get a good grade. Maybe once a term or something.....
Matt Smith
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March 11th, 2008 at 03:10pm
Omg, this is fun, I'm ~debating~ again Meg

The thing about £1000 for As is what Jax said on the other page, so I was just following on from that really. Because that is a very large sum of money, and something I think very few people could afford.

It seems to me that using money is too much of a stopgap solution. What people really need to address is the attitudes of young people who perhaps feel alienated from the school system for very valid reasons. Just giving them money so that they attend (as EMA pretty much is) isn't the right solution because it doesn't tackle the root cause of why these people don't put effort in at school. While, yes, it clearly is better to bribe your kids than let them fail at school, there is an underlying cause which should also be addressed.

I'm really talking about money because of the effect it has been proven to have upon widening the educational gap between the rich and the poor, something which is really evident in schools in Britain. Rewards generally are another matter, because not all rewards need to be material, but I was making the assumption that that non-material rewards should always be seen as a good thing, since they are not restricted by income or social class.
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