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Anji
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Anji
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May 23rd, 2008 at 11:48am
But it all originates from Ramonce and Germanic. Both which can be some what traced to Sanskrit.
norwegian wood.
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norwegian wood.
Age: 27
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May 23rd, 2008 at 02:29pm
Cantonese is my mother tongue, but now in Hong Kong it's morphed mostly into Chinglish, a weird mixture of Cantonese and English. And the younger generation have what my mother calls lazy tongue, and they don't pronounce things properly. Plus we have funny slang words in Cantonese. And the swearwords are pretty funny, most foreigners who live in Hong Kong know at least a smattering of colloquial Cantonese, although their pronounciation is a bit...eh. XD

I've been living in the U.K for about 4 years now, and what gets me is that my English is better than the kids who've been here all their life. And I don't understand how that happens, at all. I did have an American accent, because all my English teachers in Hong Kong were American/Canadian, but it's faded now into a mix of ghetto slang from my best friend, a bit of the American, and mostly normal Brit.
I also speak Mandarin, and I'm studying French although I'm not great with remembering all the tenses and the different endings for i, you, we, he, she, etc.

And I love British accents. All my friends speak slightly differently, but they're all adorable Very Happy And cockney accents make my knees wobbly.
Laughing
Matt Smith
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Matt Smith
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May 23rd, 2008 at 03:10pm
norwegian wood.:
I've been living in the U.K for about 4 years now, and what gets me is that my English is better than the kids who've been here all their life. And I don't understand how that happens, at all.

Perhaps this is because you haven't picked up the bad habits most people use yet. Tbh my signature is probably a case in point. Gramatically, it is wrong, but it is the way people do speak.

Also I guess different parts of the UK are more given over to dialects and colloquial speech.

Either that or we are a nation of horrible linguists.
Anji
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Anji
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May 25th, 2008 at 10:28am
norwegian wood.:
Cantonese is my mother tongue, but now in Hong Kong it's morphed mostly into Chinglish, a weird mixture of Cantonese and English. And the younger generation have what my mother calls lazy tongue, and they don't pronounce things properly. Plus we have funny slang words in Cantonese. And the swearwords are pretty funny, most foreigners who live in Hong Kong know at least a smattering of colloquial Cantonese, although their pronounciation is a bit...eh. XD

I've been living in the U.K for about 4 years now, and what gets me is that my English is better than the kids who've been here all their life. And I don't understand how that happens, at all. I did have an American accent, because all my English teachers in Hong Kong were American/Canadian, but it's faded now into a mix of ghetto slang from my best friend, a bit of the American, and mostly normal Brit.
I also speak Mandarin, and I'm studying French although I'm not great with remembering all the tenses and the different endings for i, you, we, he, she, etc.

And I love British accents. All my friends speak slightly differently, but they're all adorable Very Happy And cockney accents make my knees wobbly.
Laughing
My background is a bit similar to yours. I have a Thai mum and I've lived abroad, but currently am in Thailand. I do find that even though English was actually my second language, I can speak it with more fluency and more coherently than many people I know. That is mostly because, like Cantonese for you, most English speaking kids are also lazy.

Also, we get that a lot in Thai nowadays, especially here in the city where there are foreigners everywhere, local kids will use English words and English swear words.

Also, I too have a sort of American-British accent thing going on, but I have learned to interchange them depending on who I talk to, otherwise people laugh. tehe

And my mum speaks Cantonese too. Mr. Green
Kristmas_Tsanne
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Kristmas_Tsanne
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May 26th, 2008 at 02:23pm
norwegian wood.:
Cantonese is my mother tongue, but now in Hong Kong it's morphed mostly into Chinglish, a weird mixture of Cantonese and English. And the younger generation have what my mother calls lazy tongue, and they don't pronounce things properly. Plus we have funny slang words in Cantonese. And the swearwords are pretty funny, most foreigners who live in Hong Kong know at least a smattering of colloquial Cantonese, although their pronounciation is a bit...eh. XD

That happened to Denmark, as well.
Which is why children of 15 months have aroud 80 words in their vocabulary.
Croats have 200 by this time.
Danish is a language with an unusual amount of vowels, and a lot of the consonants are pronounced usually with a vowel-sound to it, which makes the language kind of fluent and it's hard for the child to know where one word stops and the other begins. In the 1950-60's, (you can see from films and documentaries) we would pronounce every word more seperately. But we've gone impatient and you have to know the language to not get very confused, also because words aren't spelled like they're said, and this confuses many people, including Danes themselves. It's a bit like English, though, with "knee" having the silent K.

I am fascinated Cassie
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